Workshop Information

Click on the day you are interested in below. To read more about each workshop, click the "+" next to the title
(Note: there are no workshops on Thursday, March 4, 2021)

Name
Educate to Motivate! Exploring the application of Self-Determination Theory to Motivate Millennials and Gen Zers
Time
11:30 AM - 1:30 PM (EST)
Description

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Motivation is essential to supporting and sustaining effective learning. Generally, motivated learners are more energized and engaged in the learning process. There are a number of benefits to educating motivated students including increased engagement, reduced anxiety, enhanced sense of collaboration and higher levels of creativity. Educators play a vital role in motivating students in higher education. We have experience in educating millennials for many years now, but we are just starting to see post-millennials (iGen Zers) enter the higher education scene, so it is critical to understand the difference in characteristics between these two generations to continue driving the motivation of our adult learners and to help them improve their academic achievement. There are many theories of motivation. This workshop will focus on Self-Determination Theory of motivation, particularly its three components; Competence, Relatedness, and Autonomy in relation to intrinsic motivations.

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  1. Compare the characteristics of "Millennials" and "iGen Zers".
  2. Differentiate between intrinsic and extrinsic motivation.
  3. Define the components of Self-Determination Theory; Competence, Relatedness and Autonomy.
  4. Develop relevant strategies to foster Post-Millennial/iGen students' motivation to learn in Team-Based Learning. 
Name
Team-Based Learning to Develop Leadership Competency for Communicating Across Cultures and Working in Multicultural Teams
Time
11:30 AM - 1:30 PM (EST)
Description

Future global leaders need to develop global leadership competencies (GLC) to tackle the complexities of globalization, not just to learn about them. To meet this challenge, this workshop aims to develop GLC using a Team-Based Learning (TBL) cross-cultural negotiation activity to help future global leaders successfully collaborate with, motivate and lead people in international settings and from different cultures. This workshop aims to help participants practice (1) their ability to understand and describe their own views of the world, how they relate to others and to question the way they act; and (2) their ability to communicate effectively and work in multicultural teams, an essential competency for global leaders.  When registering, participants will include background information and international experience to enable us to create heterogenous, multicultural teams of five.  They will receive: 1. readings on negotiation and cross-cultural communication 2. role assignment for the simulation application (Alpha, Beta or Observer) 3. simulation common info  The workshop will start with an iRAT based on the readings.  Aligned with the 4S structure, participants will receive confidential information and worksheets for their role to carry out the application in breakout rooms.  The observer will take notes during the role-play.  After 25 minutes, participants will stop negotiating whether they have reached an agreement or not and will then have a 15-minute debrief with the observer.  They will reflect both on communication issues and working in multicultural teams.  Teams will then re-join the main room for simultaneous report, feedback and discussion.  We will conclude with a discussion on the use of this activity to foster GLC in a TBL environment and suggestions for improvement.  The workshop showcases an effective instruction method that offers a clearly defined set of practices for instructors to implement an innovative, student-centred activity where students practise, reflect and develop their GLC. 

Annelise Ly Judith Ainsworth
Name
Putting the Faculty in the Student's Seat: A TBL Immersive Approach to Faculty Development
Time
11:30 AM - 1:30 PM (EST)
Description

Faculty can imagine the implications that TBL has on learners' study strategies, time management, and overall student life, however, few faculty have experienced TBL from the seat of the learner. By modifying the traditional faculty and staff development model to one utilizing TBL methodologies, there is an opportunity to "kill multiple birds with one stone". Faculty and staff can experience TBL as a learner, observe TBL facilitation, and gain knowledge to help them better complete various aspects of their jobs. The purpose of this workshop is to empower attendees to expand their approach to faculty and staff development within their departments and across their institutions to one that utilizes TBL methodology. Readiness materials will include articles and videos discussing faculty development techniques based on androgological theories. Strategies for improving faculty participation and engagement in their own professional development will be identified through collaborative discussions and case-based learning. Workshop attendees will work in teams to create a sample faculty development curriculum, identifying core topics, activities, and schedules, for a simulated department/college within a larger institution.   
 

Name
Self and Peer Assessment: More Than Just Accountability? A Re-Evaluation in Light of Backwards Design
Time
11:30 AM - 1:30 PM (EST)
Description

Have you struggled with making self and peer assessment an integral and valuable part of TBL?  Would you like a way to develop soft skills in your students that are not explicitly developed in your curriculum, but are needed in the workplace? The MGH Institute of Health Professions Physician Assistant program's TBL process of self and peer assessments has evolved organically since its inception in 2016.  In this workshop using TBL principles and backwards design, we will discuss the evolution of our self and peer assessment process from an anonymous survey that only held teammates accountable, to a process that includes a workshop on a particular theme like giving and receiving feedback, followed by a face-to-face small group process session that intentionally holds all members of the team accountable but also cultivates soft skills needed by our students in their professional settings. Small group break out rooms and a virtual gallery walk of possible themes and learning objectives will provide participants with the opportunity to consider self and peer assessments as not just the most challenging component of TBL, but also as the component with the most potential for student development and growth.

Name
Designing Course Policy Statements That Optimize Beliefs and Maximize Motivation in the TBL Classroom
Time
11:30 AM - 1:30 PM (EST)
Description

Research has shown that thoughtful syllabus design (i.e., including the use of visuals, engaging students' egos, meeting the students' need for autonomy, and increasing learner centeredness) increases student interest in our classes and positively impacts motivation for learning.  Ajzen and Fishbein (1980)'s theory of planned behavior offers additional strategies for thoughtful syllabus design and increased interest/ motivation.  The theory of planned behavior focuses on three beliefs, including behavioral beliefs, normative beliefs, and control beliefs and says that optimizing these beliefs improves attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control, intention, and behavior.  Given the potentially beneficial impact on intention and behavior in the classroom, TBL course policy statements should ideally support the development of optimal behavioral beliefs, normative beliefs, and control beliefs for all of our diverse learners.  The Designing Course Policy Statements workshop will be conducted using a TBL format. Attendees will be provided with a pre-workshop reading assignment related to the theory of planned behavior and the workshop will begin with an individual and a team Readiness Assurance Test. The workshop will continue with several Application Activities.  Application Activities will challenge teams to: (a) classify exemplar TBL course policy statements according to whether they focus on behavioral beliefs, normative beliefs, or control beliefs; and (b) to decide whether exemplar TBL course policy statements are likely to optimize behavioral beliefs, normative beliefs, and control beliefs. Upon completion of the Workshop, attendees should be able to transfer what they learned and evaluate/ redesign their own course policy statements.  

Karla Kubitz
Name
Jazz and TBL: A Workshop in Improvisation Skills for Facilitating Great Sessions
Time
11:30 AM - 1:30 PM (EST)
Description

The act of teaching is an improvisational activity. This holds true regardless of pedagogy. TBL facilitators encounter uncertainty, complexity, and change in their daily teaching activities. Like jazz musicians, they need to improvise, managing a tension between the structure imposed by the learning objectives and the freedom necessary to meet learners where they are. This workshop will draw upon traditions of jazz education to help facilitators explore their voice, an important developmental task in improvisation. Voice incorporates facilitation skills into one's own style, conveying authenticity and fueling synergy and harmony in human relationships. Teachers who have developed an authentic voice are more likely to create memorable experiences in the classroom, and to reach learners and help them navigate the difficulties of learning new material. These skills will benefit instructors teaching in any discipline, at any level, and with diverse student groups.